Impact Success Factors

As illustrated below, he backbone of the toolkit is set of success factors for industrial exploitation of project results.  The success factors are described below.

Back to Exploitation Toolkit main page

Success Factors:

Market aspects

  1. The innovation offers its early adopters a clear quantifiable comparative business advantage
  2. Targeted markets are clearly identified
  3. Market strategy is periodically reassessed also in light of the latest regulatory and standardisation developments
  4. Potential barriers for commersialisation at B2B-market, such as trust and first references, have been identified and addressed.
  5. Be aware of sectors with specific requirements of validation or formal qualifications
  6. The needed investments have been estimated and a convincing strategy for encouraging investments/obtaining further funding
  7. Competing technologies/solutions have been analysed
  8. The organisations that will commercialise the project results have been clearly identified


IP Management

  1. Non-disclosure - basics
  2. Mission and legitimate interests of partners
  3. Analysis of intellectual asset portfolios
  4. Considering IP protection mechanisms
  5. Professional assistance is engaged
  6. Review opportunities for investing in acquisition or creation of different forms of IP
  7. Clear agreements with suppliers and manufacturers


Consortium, project team and general project management

  1. Dedication of team
  2. Monitor and exploit potential synergies outside the consortium
  3. Management focus
  4. Infrastructure
  5. Risk assessment
  6. Small teams within the consortium


Demonstration and Upscaling

  1. Understand the milestones from proof-of-concept up to industrial deployment
  2. Assessment of technical readiness of both equipment and process for industrial use
  3. Address data protection/security issues
  4. Organisational aspects of upscaling
  5. Compatibility and integration with existing production environment and value chains
  6. Training


Communication

  1. Develop a sound communication strategy
  2. Branding
  3. Conferences, workshops, seminars
  4. Fairs and exhibitions
  5. Press Releases
  6. Web and social networking
  7. Identify and engage with relevant local communication channels, clusters and networks for reaching potential users

 

Same list, with some additional comments:

1. Market aspects

1.1 The innovation offers its early adopters a clear quantifiable comparative business advantage
The innovation offers its early adopters a clear quantifiable comparative business advantage, e.g., lower product costs, faster time-to-market, more complete customer service.

Back to top of list

1.2 Targeted markets are clearly identified
For instance, a specific niche market is targeted where the innovation can force its competitors out of the market niche, and then use it as a base for broader operations. There is a good understanding not only of the market for that particular innovation, but also of the agendas and markets of its potential buyers.
(for example, what are the market segments, target markets, needs, buying decisions)

Back to top of list

1.3 Market strategy is periodically reassessed also in light of the latest regulatory and standardisation developments
There is a good knowledge of the relevant regulatory and standardisation aspects, and the identified market opportunities are assessed in light of the latest developments. Market penetration strategies are assessed in light of the latest regulatory and standardisation developments with the aim to minimise the negative effects of the relevant regulatory barriers and to maximise the benefits of the relevant aspects supported by the regulation and standards.

Back to top of list

1.4 Potential barriers for commersialisation at B2B-market, such as trust and first references, have been identified and addressed.
Potential barriers for commersialisation at B2B-market, such as trust and first references, have been identified and addressed.

Back to top of list

1.5 Be aware of sectors with specific requirements of validation or formal qualification.
Identify if potential B2B-customers belong to sectors with specific requirements of validation or formal qualification.

Back to top of list

1.6 The needed investments have been estimated and a convincing strategy for encouraging investments/obtaining further funding
The needed investments have been estimated and a convincing strategy for encouraging investments/obtaining further funding have been drafted. Financial viability for investors and (B2B)-customers has been assessed.

Back to top of list

1.7 Competing technologies/solutions have been analysed
Competing technologies/solutions have been analysed.

Back to top of list

1.8 The organisations that will commercialise the project results have been clearly identified
This is of particular importance if exploitation is only really possible through the integration of results owned by different project participants.

Back to top of list

2. IP Management

2.1 Non-disclosure - basics
Through non-disclosure, consortium members are obliged to keep sensitive information confidential and ensure any disclosure of such information is done in confidence and with prior permission.

Back to top of list

2.2 Mission and legitimate interests of partners
The IP rules take into account the mission and legitimate interests of both public research institutes and participating industrial partners.

Back to top of list

2.3 Analysis of intellectual asset portfolios.
An analysis of intellectual asset portfolios is performed, and programs for their monitoring and enforcement are developed and implemented. Capture and manage critical IP portfolio using ICT-tools for IP-intelligence in order to sustain value of IP and protect existing IP investments.

Back to top of list

2.4 Considering IP protection mechanisms
IP protection should be considered, for instance but not necessarily via patents or other IP protection mechanisms (such as encryption,…).

Back to top of list

2.5 Professional assistance is engaged
Once the decision has been made to proceed with IP protection, an IP lawyer or attorney is professionally engaged to assist with the formal protection and advisory work.

Back to top of list

2.6 Review opportunities for investing in acquisition or creation of different forms of IP
Project partners review opportunities for investing in acquisition or creation of different forms of IP during the project.

Back to top of list

2.7 Clear agreements with suppliers and manufacturers
Clear agreements are made with suppliers and manufacturers (e.g., restricting the agreement to a certain technology field; restricting the agreement to a certain application or market field; restricting the agreement in time).

Back to top of list

 

3. Project team and general project management

3.1 Dedication of team
The research team consists of highly motivated and highly skilled people with talent and passion for this specific research. When research is conducted by a company, CEO shows commitment and support to the project (including allocation of company’s funds). When research is conducted by a university/research institute, the commitment is shown by the head of laboratory/department.

Back to top of list

3.2 Monitor and exploit potential synergies outside the consortium
The team is open for ideas from outside (open innovation concept) and monitors other projects or initiatives in order to identify possible partnerships that could reinforce the project or the route to exploitation. This includes participation in clustering activities, but however any cooperation with other projects should be done on voluntary basis.

Back to top of list

3.3 Management focus
Consortium managers serve as a catalyst and coach, keeping everyone focused on the end goal and making sure the team is doing whatever it takes to overcome the powers/inertia that hold back the innovation.

Back to top of list

3.4 Infrastructure
The project team (consortium) uses research facilities of a participating university/research center which allows for access to unique or state-of-the-art equipment.

Back to top of list

3.5 Risk assessment
Regular performance of risk assessments including the management of mitigation actions.

Back to top of list

3.6 Small teams within the consortium
Working with small-size partners/in small groups allows for making decisions quickly.

Back to top of list

 

4. Demonstration and Upscaling

4.1 Understand and agree on the milestones from proof-of-concept up to industrial deployment
The different steps or milestones towards industrial use at relevant scale have to be understood and addressed. (Eg. through TRL scale). The whole consortium agrees on a common framework and milestones to the specific technology/product to be developed within the project, marking the progress towards industrial exploitation.

Example: Clearly describe functional (and other) requirements of Lab demonstrator.
First basic prototype is developed. The prototype still has a research status, but it is moving from purely theoretical calculations toward a proof in reality as tests are being verified and the results can be seen in a laboratory.

Example: Clearly describe functional (and other) of Industrial demonstrator.
An industrial demonstrator takes into account all stages of manufacturing to achieve a successful end product.

Back to top of list

4.2 Assessment of technical readiness of both equipment and process for industrial use
Technical readiness of both equipment and process for industrial use at relevant scale has been assessed.

Back to top of list

4.3 Address data protection/security issues
In the case that the innovative technology involves the exchange of data, data protection/security issues are considered.

Back to top of list

4.4 Organisational aspects of upscaling
Organisational aspects of upscaling have been analysed.

Back to top of list

4.5 Compatibility and integration with existing production environment and value chains
Compatibility and integration with existing production environment and value chains have been analysed.

Back to top of list

4.6 Analysis of qualification requirements and competence gap
Skills, knowledge and workforce: Analysis of qualification requirements and competence gap for industrial upscaling internally and externally.

Back to top of list

4.7 Training
Make it possible for end and lead users to acquire the right skills to effectively benefit from your innovation.

Back to top of list

 

5. Communication

5.1 Develop a sound communication strategy
Clearly identify targets and messages to be involved in the communication of your activity.

Back to top of list

5.2 Branding
Develop a coherent project-product image and brand.

Back to top of list

5.3 Conferences, workshops, seminars
Leverage on the full potential of public events for promoting the project results.

Back to top of list

5.4 Fairs and exhibition
Carefully choose the most appropriate fairs and exhibitions at local, national and international level for showcasing the project achievements.

Back to top of list

5.5 Press Releases
Engage the local and international press in the communication of results.

Back to top of list

5.6 Web and social networking
Take full advantage of the internet for the promotion and dissemination of project achievements.

Back to top of list

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • The full list of success Factors can be viewed here.

     

     

  • The following case illustrates the relevance of the Impact success factors.

     

    If you wish to suggest other project cases for publication, please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

  •  

    Home

    The European IPR Helpdesk gave a presentation at the FoF-Impact events of 17 February 2016 and 1 December 2016.  You can download the respective presentations via the respective links.

    An overview of supporting documents in relation to the Impact Success Factors can be found here.

    The European IPR Helpdesk believes that knowing how to manage Intellectual Property (IP) and Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) is the ticket to innovation and competitiveness in Europe. The European IPR Helpdesk offers free of charge, first-line support on IP and IPR matters to beneficiaries of EU funded research projects and EU SMEs involved in transnational partnership agreements, especially within the Enterprise Europe Network (EEN).

    CEN-CENELEC gave a presentation at the FoF-Impact of 1 December 2016.  You can download the presentation here.

    By setting common standards that are applied across the whole of the European single market, CEN and CENELEC ensure the protection of consumers, facilitate cross-border trade, ensure the interoperability of products, encourage innovation and technological development, include environmental protection and enable businesses to grow. Products and services that meet these European Standards (ENs) can be offered and sold in all of the participating countries.
    CEN and CENELEC bring together the national standards agencies of 34 countries. Our network involves business federations, commercial and consumer organizations, environmental groups and other societal stakeholders. More than 60,000 technical experts from industry, research, academia and other backgrounds are directly involved in our work.

    Together, CEN and CENELEC provide a platform for the development of European Standards and other technical specifications across a wide range of sectors. We work closely with the European Commission to ensure that standards correspond with any relevant EU legislation.

    CEN and CENELEC also cooperate with respectively the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) to reach agreements on common standards that can be applied throughout the whole world, thereby facilitating international trade.

     

    EFFRA Logo

     

    In order to promote project results, EFFRA deploys the Innovation Portal.  Furthermore, EFFRA organises and co-organises events and workshops, where project results are presented. 

    A directory including more service providers is being developed.  If you wish to be included in this directory, please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

     

  • From the start of the Factories of the Future PPP (FoF PPP) under the call 2010, EFFRA deployed the ‘EFFRA Innovation Portal’ in cooperation with the European Commission. The initial value of the Innovation Portal was to have one entry point with the essential information about all the FoF projects, including the organisations that where participating, the related call topics, start date, end date, funding etc.

    Example: screenshot from the DYNXPERTS project main page.

    In 2014, a new feature was launched within the EFFRA Innovation Portal, enabling the project consortia to upload information about the specific project results and demonstrators that their project generated.   This is a very important step toward a structured and systematic monitoring of the outcome of the FoF PPP.  The feature was presented to the FoF project coordinators at the FoF Impact Workshop in March 2014. However, the actual collection of project results and demonstrators increased substantially towards the FoF Impact Workshop of April 2015.     There, additional characteristics in related to the project outcome were reported and discussed, such as spin-offs, patents, standardisation (an overview of the collected data was extracted from the Innovation Portal is included in annex).

    A new version of the Innovation Portal will be deployed in the first half of 2017.   More about the EFFRA Innovation Portal

  • You can download here a guide with respect to the set-up of workshops in view of addressing the impact success factors.

  • The basic version of this Impact toolkit was established through the FoF-Impact coordination action, a two-year European project coordinated by EFFRA (Grant agreement number 637212) during 2015 and 2016.

    The project consortium consisted of the following organisations:

    EFFRA | Agoria | CRIT | LMS | Mondragon | Swerea IVF | Tecnalia | TWI | VDMA

     

    In addition to FoF-Impact, four other projects under the same FoF-07-2014 call topic have been working to support the enhancement of the impact of the ‘Factories of the Future’ partnership. These projects are:

     

    These projects were funded by the European Union through the 'Factories of the Future' Public-Private Partnership under Horizon 2020.